This month’s Denver Art Museum Picks

The pre-Columbian study gallery at the Denver Art Museum. Photo by Steve Crecelius. Courtesy Denver Art Museum.
The pre-Columbian study gallery at the Denver Art Museum. Photo by Steve Crecelius. Courtesy Denver Art Museum.

What resources do you love the most at the Denver Art Museum? I’m hooked on the pre-Columbian section and was pretty pleased to see the monthly drop-in drawing being hosted there this month.

This Tuesday, January 14th there’s a drop-in drawing program in the pre-Columbian and Spanish Colonial gallery. While this drawing event recurs every second Tuesday of the month -I’m highlighting this one as the work in the Denver Art Museum pre-Columbian galleries is an especially good collection. http://www.denverartmuseum.org/collections/pre-columbian-art

from the press release

Drop-In Drawing: Texture, Pattern & Repetition

January 14, 1 p.m.

“Find patterns and textures in the Spanish Colonial and pre-Columbian galleries to create a continuous field composition. All experience levels welcome. Bring your own supplies or use one of our communal sketch pads. Drop-In Drawing will occur every month on the second Tuesday, focusing on a different topic each time. Meet on level one of the Hamilton Building. Included with general admission; reservations are not required.”

The Spanish Colonial art galleries at the Denver Art Museum. Photo by Steve Crecelius. Courtesy Denver Art Museum.
The Spanish Colonial art galleries at the Denver Art Museum. Photo by Steve Crecelius. Courtesy Denver Art Museum.
Roy Lichtenstein, The Violin, 1976. Oil paint and magna on canvas. Denver Art Museum;  Funds from Jan and Frederick R. Mayer, Mr. and Mrs. Aron B. Katz, Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Graham, Mr. and Mrs. Mark Addison and Anonymous Donors. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein.
Roy Lichtenstein, The Violin, 1976. Oil paint and magna on canvas. Denver Art Museum; Funds from Jan and Frederick R. Mayer, Mr. and Mrs. Aron B. Katz, Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Graham, Mr. and Mrs. Mark Addison and Anonymous Donors. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein.

Fracture: Cubism and After

Opening January 26

“The most revolutionary and influential movement of the 20th century, cubism’s influence continues even today. Since the Renaissance, when artists had perfected the device of perspective, a painting had been thought of as a window into the world. But cubist painters understood these canvases to be painted objects themselves and rejected the idea that a pictured object rendered with traditional perspective was any more “real” than an abstraction of that object on the flat surface. Cubist paintings were always based on things in the visible world, but often showed objects fractured as if seen from more than one point of view at once, or built up of flattened forms, like a collage (an art form invented by cubists). This rotation includes 13 paintings, ranging from Nature Morte, a 1914 work by Pablo Picasso, to Roy Lichtenstein’s Violin from 1976. Fracture: Cubism and After is included in museum admission.”

Denver Art Museum
100 W. 14th Avenue Parkway
Denver, CO 80204

www.denverartmuseum.org

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